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joan burton, ireland
Labour market reform: Why skills matter

Ireland’s job market has improved markedly, thanks in no small part to strong policies for new skills to meet evolving demands and engagement with people out of work. 

michael noonan, ireland, economy
Ireland’s economy: A solid recovery

The recovery in the Irish economy is well underway. Determined policy responses to the fiscal, economic and financial sector challenges Ireland faced are now bearing fruit, with Ireland expected to be among the fastest-growing economies in the OECD this year and next. 

angel gurria, oecd, ireland
Sustaining Ireland’s recovery for all

When I launched the OECD’s 2011 Economic Survey of Ireland, the Irish economy was in the depths of a deep recession. Two years ago, the clouds were beginning to clear. Today, I am delighted to see how far and how quickly the country has bounced back.

michael forbes, oecd, ireland
Ireland’s economy and the OECD: From bricks to brains

Nothing has demonstrated Ireland’s shift to modern economic policies more concretely than our decision to become a founder member of the OECD in 1961. Since then the OECD has been a trusted partner in our economic and social policy evolution.

ireland, oecd, oecd observer
Ireland's economy: At the cutting edge

For an offprint of this OECD Observer Spotlight, contact observer@oecd.org.

ireland, globalisation, david haugh, oecd, economy, recession
Ireland’s economy: Still riding the globalisation wave

The recession in Ireland was long and deep, but has been followed by a marked recovery. Why is the expansion in Ireland so strong?

innovation, ireland, oecd, it, R&D, productivity
Innovating Ireland

Ireland has well-known firms such as Guinness for beer and beverages, Ryanair for air travel, and Smurfit Kappa for paper and packaging, not to mention dairies, beef and fish. However, for a small country that has turned itself into a thriving pharmaceutical and IT hub, Ireland is not awash with global brands in these sectors. Compare with, say, Finland which has Nokia, or Sweden which has Ericsson. True, there is Airtricity, but that innovative wind energy firm now belongs to an overseas company.

Trinity lights the way forward
microsoft, innovation, ireland
OECD Observer roundtable: Ireland's innovation challenge
Ireland has bounced back from the crisis to become one of the OECD’s most dynamic economies. A key help has been the continued inflow of capital investment from abroad, allowing the country to bolster its position as a European hub for the likes of IT, finance, pharmaceuticals, engineering, and more. Ireland has been an attractive destination for global high-value investments for decades, yet its own innovation system lags that of other similar-sized OECD countries. Closing the gap would strengthen the country’s long-term outlook, but how can this be done?

Dublin, economy, innovation, investment, ireland, IT, silicon docks
Banking on Silicon Docks
kpmg, ireland, start-up, ireland, ida, dublin, shaun murphy, kpmg ireland
KPMG: Ireland: Open for investment
"The start-up environment is exceptionally dynamic. Forbes magazine recently listed Dublin as one of the top seven cities in the world for start-ups. Ireland has the youngest workforce in Europe with 40% of the population under 29 years old."

ireland, blue economy, maritime, aquaculture, oecd
Casting off towards a blue future

Open any atlas, look at any globe, and Ireland appears as a small green island on Europe’s Atlantic rim. In fact, Ireland’s territory is almost the size of Germany, and mostly blue.

brazil, oecd, migration, ireland
From Goias to Galway

Brazilian Jobert Marinho stands in the doorway of his local gym, where he trains, in Gort, County Galway, November 2014. 

ireland, claire keane, oecd, crisis, recovery, jobs, employment
From crisis to recovery: Overcoming scars and social costs

The economic and financial crisis has posed a stern test of many countries, though in Ireland, which enjoyed a boom for over a decade, the challenge was particularly stark. The scars are still there, but so are opportunities. Well-targeted, sensitive social policies can yield positive results. 

diaspora, enda kenny, immigration, ireland, migration
Migration: A flexible return ticket

Today, bolstered by steady economic growth and an emerging confidence in Ireland’s future, the government is taking a new tack by fostering a bolder engagement towards emigration and the diaspora. 

diaspora, emigrants, ireland, migration, workforce
Ireland's global workforce

The writer James Joyce was unique in many ways, but when he left Ireland in 1904, he was joining a tradition of expatriate Irish writers. Difficulty publishing at home in what was then a conservative country was one reason for his departure: in his 1912 poem, “Gas from a burner”, he referred to Ireland as “This lovely land that always sent Her writers and artists to banishment.” But Joyce also declared that after his death “Dublin” would be found inscribed on his heart. Today the word “Joyce” is in turn inscribed in Ireland’s own heritage.

economy, ireland, OECD, Save our seafront, dublin airport
The capacity conundrum

A growing economy means increased need for office space, housing and infrastructure. Can Ireland meet that demand?