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Can we save our democracies from hackers?

The first generation of those born into the internet age is already joining the workforce and yet the internet still manages to disrupt. The phenomenon of fake news is one of the by-products of digital transformation and it is worth taking a look at what is new, and not so new, and how it fits in to the rest of what some are calling the “post-truth world”.

Opening a new chapter in the infrastructure of Latin America

In Latin America, as elsewhere, sustainable infrastructure plays a vital role in improving the quality of life and supporting economic growth. It determines our capacity to engage competitively in global trade and to grow our economies. In our cities, where 80% of the region’s population lives, infrastructure helps reduce poverty by enhancing access to basic services and facilitating access to knowledge and employment opportunities.

Globalisation: Don’t patch it up, shake it up

In Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa’s novel Il Gattopardo (The Leopard)character Tancredi Falconeri famously says: “If we want things to stay as they are, things will have to change.” The Sicilian aristocracy he represents has only one way to preserve its privileges against Garibaldi’s “Risorgimento”: change things on the surface so that in practice nothing changes at all.

oecd,health,healthcare,crowdfunding,ALS,movember,campaign,charity
Healthcare: Pouring a little cold water on crowdfunding

Who would have thought that the Ice Bucket Challenge would be credited for bankrolling healthcare breakthroughs? The online campaign, which encouraged participants to be filmed while pouring a bucket of ice water on their heads and then inviting friends to do the same, was started in 2014 by ordinary people as a fun way to raise money for a relative with motor neuron disease, a normally fatal neurodegenerative condition that is also known as Lou Gehrig’s Disease, or Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). The idea went viral, with millions of people, as well as famous presidents and rock stars, joining in. The challenge became the fifth most popular Google search in 2014 and raised more than US$220 million worldwide. Little wonder the ALS Association credits its recent discovery of a new gene, giving hope for ”real, meaningful therapies” for ALS, to the Ice Bucket Challenge. 

Our health systems must put people at the centre

Looking back at what we have achieved over the past few decades in the health sector, in many ways the future is looking quite bright. People are living longer, healthier lives. Health data continues to grow exponentially. New health technologies, such as fitness trackers, wearables and remote monitoring systems, are breaking down the information walls of hospitals and clinics, empowering people to assess and monitor better their own health in real time. And new drug treatments tailored to the genetic profile of each individual–precision medicine–have the potential to revolutionise healthcare. 

Is there still time to save our trust in government?

Public trust is not doing well in many modern democracies. If it is the canary in the coal mine, in survey after survey, the canary has been brought up wheezing at best.

oecd,violence,fragility,conflict,state
A more violent world?

If you have had the impression that there is more violence in the world nowadays, you may not be wrong. According to States of Fragility 2016: Understanding Violence, the world has been becoming more violent for a decade; indeed, according to the Uppsala University Conflict Data Program, 2014 and 2015 marked the second and third worst years in terms of fatalities since the Cold War ended a quarter of a century ago. As 22% of the global population currently live in fragile contexts and their proportion is anticipated to rise to 32% by 2050, the links between fragility and violence are becoming increasingly clear. 

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OECD Observer crossword Q1 2017

Try our latest OECD Observer crossword.

health, OECD, rural, urban
Can healthcare policy and technology heal rural-urban divides?

Telehealth is not a substitute for seeing real doctors, but can play a valuable role in patient-centred healthcare and in closing the rural-urban divide as well. But it will require investment and determined policies. 

oecd, economy, growth, inclusiveness
Going for inclusiveness and productivity

Inclusiveness should be a prime objective of growth-oriented policies, alongside productivity and employment, Going for Growth 2017 argues. 

Global tax and transparency: We have the tools, now we must make them work

If there is a silver lining to the 2008 financial crisis, it is that it was a catalyst for the unprecedented progress we have made in building robust international tax standards for the interconnected global economy of the 21st century.

oecd,gender,women,equality,justin trudeau
Catch up with OECD March on gender

International Women’s Day is being celebrated throughout this week at the OECD. On 10 March a conference on Gender Equality before the Law will probe legal issues and rights for women and girls. Business, finance and gender were the focus of a special conference on 8 March 2017; documents available.

oecd, japan, economy, shinzo abe, angel gurria
Japan should boost inclusive growth to help address demographic and fiscal challenges

The Japanese economy has gained momentum, with “Abenomics” playing a key role in the country’s economic revival. But the latest OECD Economic Survey of Japan warns that more needs to be done to underpin inclusive growth, productivity and well-being amid pressures from high and rising government debt and a shrinking workforce.

oecd
Halving road deaths by 2020: A global health priority

Every year 1.25 million people are killed and as many as 50 million seriously injured in road crashes worldwide. This epidemic of road injury causes huge economic losses and places severe burdens on public health systems. Fortunately, this predictable and preventable global health emergency has now been given the international recognition it deserves. Road safety is included in the United Nations Sustainable Development Goal for Health, with a target to halve road deaths and injuries by 2020. This provides the strongest possible mandate for urgent action against a scourge that has become the number one killer of young people in all regions of the world. 

health,OECD,healthcare,ageing
Our patients have changed, our healthcare must now follow

In the coming two decades, it is expected that the number of individuals aged 65 and over will nearly double, so that there will be over 1 billion older adults worldwide. With our healthcare systems struggling to cope, this prospect has been characterised by some as a “grey tsunami” that threatens to raise costs, create inefficiencies and ultimately bankrupt us. Describing our changing demographic as a tsunami is problematic.

oecd,globalisation,economy,governance,international
The OECD: New wings or still the same old club?

The political landscape of global governance is changing profoundly. This is posing great challenges to policy makers and organisations such as the OECD.

care, economy, efficiency, finances, health, NHS, OECD ministerial meeting, UK health, wellness
Towards sustained progress in global healthcare

For everyone working in the healthcare sector, 2017 arrives with much to celebrate and a great deal to ponder. On the one hand, we can look back on decades of sustained progress, with universal coverage of healthcare rising and people enjoying generally healthier and longer lives than ever before. Funding is increasing and the OECD’s figures on the state of play show the number of doctors and nurses has grown significantly across most OECD countries since 2000.

oecd,health,healthcare,medicare
Managing new health technologies

Countries around the world are struggling with rising healthcare bills. Every introduction of pricey new biologics, surgical procedures, and exotic “precision” treatments causes ever-increasing fiscal stress, leading to deficit spending, cutbacks in other government services, and insurance costs shouldered by firms and employees alike. Yet, freezing budgetary allocations is clearly not an option, as citizens in our ageing societies are likely to demand more and better access to new health innovations, and essential healthcare services. What can be done?

health, health care, OECD, oecd observer, francesca colombo
Healthcare systems: Tackling waste to boost resources

Is there such a thing as a right amount of health spending? In an ideal world, this would likely mean spending that achieves effective healthcare services, with good outcomes for patients, the right number of professionals with the right skills, and delivers good value for tax payers with little, if any, wastage. Finding that balance is a difficult challenge. 

Happy 60th anniversary to the EU

Today 25 March 2017 marks the 60th anniversary of the Treaty of Rome, the agreement that laid the ground for today's European Union, in which people, goods, services and capital can move freely among member states. The European Commission has been involved in the work of our organisation and its different bodies since the OECD began in 1961, thanks to a protocol to the OECD Convention. Both institutions share common values and aims, including promoting peaceful international co-operation, respect of human dignity, liberty, democracy and equality among our countries and people.

health,nurse,OECD,patient
People-centred healthcare: Don’t forget the nurses!

Is the concept of “people-centred care” just new jargon for cost-cutting and to reduce access to routine healthcare? Or does it have the potential to improve both the health and well-being of people, while making the health system more efficient and less costly, and helping people to become healthier at the same time?  This is the existential and fundamental question which policymakers and funders, together with the public and wider healthcare community, must answer.

care, health, healthcare, OECD, patient
Complex patients: How healthcare must adapt to their needs

Pepe is a 74 year-old widower, who lives with one of his two sons in a small apartment in the Spanish city of Valencia. His son works at night and sleeps all morning. Pepe spends most of his day at home and feels lonely and depressed. He suffers from pulmonary fibrosis, heart failure, hypertension and dyslipidaemia. He takes corticosteroids, nebulisers and inhalers, as well as drugs against hypertension, statins and anti-coagulants. Pepe is often short of breath and also requires oxygen therapy. Sometimes he feels like he is dying and his son takes him to hospital. In the last 18 months, Pepe visited the hospital emergency room 39 times. He was admitted to the pulmonology department in eight of these visits.

AMR, health, healthcare, mark pearson, OECD
The challenge of antimicrobial resistance: The hidden “fil rouge” for healthcare policy

Two issues are at the centre of the debate on how to make sure our health systems more sustainable: tackling unnecessary spending on health, and making sure that medical innovations deliver the right products at the right price.  Both of these two key issues are epitomised by one of the biggest public health challenges we face today: that of antimicrobial resistance (AMR). 

Fighting poverty means fighting sexism

Nowhere in the world do women have as many opportunities as men, whether those opportunities are economic, social or political. If we’re going to make our commitments under the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) count, we have to start here.

oecd,health,health care
People-centred healthcare: What empowering policies are needed

The word “patient” comes from Latin, and means “the one that suffers”. Healthcare has historically been about “taking care” and “protecting” the patient that suffers. Under this view the patient is more or less helpless. The healthcare professional on the other hand plays the dominant role, as an authority, to be heeded and obeyed. This attitude is all too prevalent today, in that the passive patient is not seen as having useful knowledge or capacities, and so must wait patiently for the doctors’ orders. 

Education and diabetes

Did you know that there is a correlation between diabetes and education levels? People with the lowest level of education are more than twice as likely to report having diabetes than those with the highest level across EU countries, a close look at Eurostat data shows (see chart).

health,OECD,data,healthcare,innovation
Governing data for better health and healthcare

The healthcare sector is awash with data, whose range and volume are growing exponentially. But they will sit unused in data warehouses, often from fear of being misused, unless fundamental action is taken. The OECD Recommendation on Health Data Governance can help countries in managing the risks and harnessing the benefits from health data.

health,OECD,eu,patient,european commission
An agenda for robust healthcare

We often say that in healthcare policy there is no one-size-fits-all solution. But despite the many differences in how countries define, organise and deliver health services and medical care, a number of common challenges can be tackled together. Most national health systems face unprecedented pressures to evolve, be it because of demographics, technological developments, changing epidemiology or patient engagement, and they often struggle to deliver tailored, patient-centred care, while keeping their spending in check.

health,OECD,biac
Why patient-centred approaches are important

Significant changes in demographics, epidemiology and lifestyles have created novel challenges for health systems. Recent OECD estimates suggest that the share of population aged over 65 will rise to nearly 30% by 2060.  Given existing budgetary constraints, today’s health systems are struggling to meet the challenges posed by an ageing society and the increasing burden of chronic diseases and related comorbidities it brings.

health,OECD,tuac,jocelyne cabanal,cfdt
Patient-centred policies must be centred on healthcare workers too

The OECD Health Ministerial in Paris on 17 January has the ambition of paving the way to “The Next Generation of Health Reforms” with “people at the centre”. Representing the Trade Union Advisory Committee to the OECD (TUAC) on this occasion, and in close partnership with the Public Services International (representing public sector trade unions), I am bringing the voice of the labour movement to the table.

care, end-of-life, health, healthcare, medication, OECD, palliative, patient
Designing value-based health systems for patients: The example of pain control and palliative care

Health systems strengthening efforts have focused on enhancing performance without significant attention to what value means to the ultimate users of the system–patients. Generating metrics that can better drive health systems in a manner that places patients at the core is an ethical, health and economic imperative. In fact, measures that comprehensively assess patient experiences, preferences and outcomes, can improve accuracy in priority-setting and promote the delivery of value-based care.

health, innovation, johnson&johnson, OECD, patient
Johnson & Johnson: Leading innovations for better health care

The OECD Health Ministerial Conference and the OECD Policy Forum, with the purpose of discussing new ideas and policies to shape health reforms, can help ensure that future generations, and their children, have greater access to healthcare, grow up embracing health and wellness and possibly survive diseases we consider impossible to cure today. At the same time, adequate access to public health services can positively impact broader social and economic factors such as productivity.

health, OECD
The PaRIS initiative: Helping healthcare policies to do better for patients

When is healthcare successful? All too often, the answer is that we don’t really know. Although healthcare consumes almost a tenth of GDP in the OECD, our understanding of the value and outcomes that this large and often growing spending achieves remains limited. 

green,korea,environment,economy,green bond,jeju island
From a green jewel, a green economy

Jeju Island lies in the Strait of Korea. Often described as the “Hawaii of Korea”, it is also a tropical jewel in the country’s strategy towards greening its economy. 

BEPS, digital, digitalisation, Internet, pascal saint-amans, tax
Tax challenges, disruption and the digital economy

The digital economy is a transformative process, brought about by advances in information and communications technology (ICT) which has made technology cheaper and more powerful, changing business processes and bolstering innovation across all sectors of the economy, including traditional industries. Today, sectors as diverse as retail, media, manufacturing and agriculture are being impacted in some way by the rapid spread of digitalisation. In the broadcasting and media industry, for instance, the expanding role of data through user-generated content and social networking have enabled internet advertising to surpass television as the largest advertising medium.

Paris, climate change, oecd, observer, spotlight
Ville Lumière: Paris lights the way on climate

"We want to step out of the vicious circle of an economy which is an increasing drain on resources, and enter another circle… Paris is fully committed to combating climate change and determined to move forward as quickly as possible."  –Anne Hidalgo, Mayor of Paris 

The politics of globalisation circa 1773

Newness in politics has a long and eventful history. Globalisation and the battle for and against are no exception, as the events of the late 18th century show.

joan clos,africa, development, OECD, urbanisation
A 21st century vision for urbanisation

If urbanisation is one of the most important global trends of the 21st century, with some 70% of the world’s population forecasted to live in cities by 2050, then urbanisation in Africa–and the ways in which that growth occurs–marks one of the most significant opportunities for achieving global sustainable development.

economy,catherine mann,economic outlook,oecd
Slower outlook

The global economy is projected to grow at a slower pace this year than in 2015, with only a modest uptick expected in 2017, the OECD’s latest interim Economic Outlook warns. The Outlook warns that a low-growth trap has taken root, as poor growth expectations further depress trade, investment, productivity and wages.

oecd,shimon peres,israel
Shimon Peres

Shimon Peres paid a memorable visit to the OECD on 8 March 2013.

africa,climate,environment,energy
Africa’s choice: Business-as-usual or a green agenda?

The Paris Agreement on climate change signals the end of business as usual for energy industries. For the first time in history more than 150 developed and developing countries have promised to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. But how binding are these agreements? And do they provide impetus for local action in Africa?

africa,cities,growth,oecd,development,habitat,urban,tangier
Where cities can take Africa

Tangier in 2000 was a sleepy coastal city in the north of Morocco. Fifteen years later, Tangier’s population has exploded three-fold into a vibrant metropolitan area of 1.5 million inhabitants. The city’s free-zones have attracted new industries, such as automobile producers. A new business district called Tangier City Center and new satellite cities arise around Tangier’s old town, providing local inhabitants with modern infrastructure and amenities that have been sorely lacking. A new high-speed train is being built to connect people with the state-of-the-art Ibn Batouta International Airport.

oecd,africa,pollution,environment,onitsha,nigeria
Urban pollution: Clearing the air

Air pollution in African cities is a major health and environmental challenge that must become a focus of urban policies. 

africa, city, development, growth, OECD, urban
Urban growth’s natural increase

Africa’s urban population growth rate was the world’s fastest at 4% between 1960 and 2010, and it is clear that urbanisation across its 54 countries will continue to pose policy challenge in the years ahead. But unlike in many other regions of the world, people quitting the countryside to settle in cities will not be the main driver of that growth.

How China’s rebalancing affects Africa’s development finance … and more

2015 has been a challenging year for Africa. Average growth of African economies weakened in 2015 to 3.6%, down from an average annual 5% enjoyed since 2000.

Africa’s blue economy

The world’s oceans, seas and rivers are a major source of wealth, creating trillions of dollars’ worth in goods and services as well as employing billions of people. […] Yet Africa’s blue potential remains untapped.

Integrating the local and global urban agendas

In October, world leaders will gather in Quito for the Habitat III summit to launch the New Urban Agenda. This is on top of the start this year of the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). 

Africapolis: Measuring urbanisation dynamics in West Africa

Africa is the least urbanised continent in the world but an urban transition is very much underway. This is particularly visible in West Africa where the number of urban agglomerations increased from 152 in 1950 to almost 2,000 in 2010. Between 2000 and 2010 alone, the urban population grew by over 40 million people, making towns and cities home to 41% of the region’s total population.

Africa’s urbanisation and structural transformation

We don’t know the name, or the place and exact date of birth, of the baby who changed world history. My guess is that she was born somewhere in Africa in 2007. Not that she cared as she lay there all wrinkled and raging at the disagreeable turn her life had just taken, but it was thanks to her that for the first time ever, the world had more urban dwellers than country folk.

oecd,africa,korea,trade,export,import
Korean-African trade techs up

Korean trade with Africa has more than quadrupled since the late 1990s.

African cities can be actors of structural transformation

African nations are exploring how best to harness the potential of cities as agents of change to achieve progress towards the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and the African Union’s Agenda 2063. The current African Economic Outlook (AEO), jointly produced by the African Development Bank, the OECD Development Centre and the United Nations Development Programme, warns that policy makers and donors too often are blind to the territorial realities of the economies they are trying to help develop. Economies are seen as sectors rather than places. And thus sectoral lenses tend to limit policy action to a few specific tools, regardless of the complexity of problems that demand a place-based, multi-sectoral and participatory approach.

Top earners: Why did the 1% get so rich?

Across much of the OECD, the share of national income taken by the top 1% of earners has risen, sometimes sharply, in recent decades. 

Was it worth it?

Graduate teaching courses are becoming more popular again in many countries, though ageing continues to affect the profession, and making the career more attractive for longer remains a challenge. For insight, we asked a retired teacher to explain why, despite the challenges, he stayed in the job.

digital, Internet, OECD, technology
Open season

I’m sure you’ve all heard about “the open Internet.” The expression builds upon a rich pedigree of the term “open” in various contexts. It gives the impression that “open” is some positive attribute, and when we use the expression of the “open Internet” it seems that we're lauding it in some way. But are we, and if so, in what way?

Latvia joins the OECD

The OECD welcomes Latvia as its 35th member country. Latvia joined the OECD on 1 July 2016. 

oecd,andy wyckoff,digital,innovation
Digital economy: Why a brighter future could be in our pocket

The digital economy is here, and growing every day, sometimes in surprising ways. As ministers gather for major meetings in Paris and Cancun, government leaders should be in no doubt about the key role they must play in securing the digital economy’s future as a driver of productive and inclusive progress.

consumer, digital, ICT, Internet, OECD, privacy, trust
Bridging policy silos to boost trust online

Three out of four people access the Internet everyday across the OECD. But one-third of those daily users don't yet buy online. Why not? According to a 2014 consumer survey the top two concerns reported by EU Internet shoppers are the misuse of personal data and security of online payments. 

digital, Internet, OECD,secure,security,online,ICT
Ensuring a secure Internet of Things

The rapid rise of a new generation of connected, intelligent devices—collectively known as the Internet of Things, or IoT—is more than just the latest digital enabler to impact organisations of all sizes. The IoT presents vast opportunities for governments and businesses to improve internal efficiencies, serve their customers or constituents better, and enter new markets or provide new services. Such services will transform the way we work and live every day. As the IoT develops, it is essential that security-by-design be a core feature of the connected device ecosystem.

Robots versus workers

A clash between robots and workers is unlikely. Rather, disruptive technology can make workers more efficient without replacing them, and raise profits, while maintaining or increasing a company’s workforce.

digital, innovation, Internet, OECD, oecd privacy guidelines, privacy
Promoting innovation, protecting privacy

Few issues are of greater concern to Internet users today than privacy protection. Everyone wants the benefits of Internet access, but few want to sacrifice their privacy or face the risk of cyber theft as a consequence. 

communications, crime, cyber, digital divide, digital economy, information, Internet, technology, trust
One Internet

The Internet is now an essential part of our lives and a critical element of the world economy. Internet penetration increased almost sevenfold in the past 15 years, from 6.5% of the world population in 2000 to 43% in 2015.

computer,digital,machine learning,pedro domingos
A mystery in the machine

Algorithms lie at the heart of machine learning, which, in turn lies at the heart of much of modern life–from online shopping to intelligence gathering. But most of us know little about these powerful tools and how they work. Is this wise?

The digital disruption of productivity

The UK’s tallest mountain is Ben Nevis in Scotland. Recently, it became one metre taller, standing now at 1 345m rather than 1 344m above sea level. Of course, the mountain did not actually grow. Rather, the team of Ordnance Survey experts who re-measured it for the first time since 1949 were able to do so more accurately because of improvements in technology, and specifically through the use of GPS.

A rural trip through time

Imagine travelling through time, not as Stephen Hawking would, through wormholes into a new dimension, but rather just to see how farming might look several decades from now. How policy makers and farmers might appreciate such foresight.

ireland, blue economy, maritime, aquaculture, oecd
Casting off towards a blue future

Open any atlas, look at any globe, and Ireland appears as a small green island on Europe’s Atlantic rim. In fact, Ireland’s territory is almost the size of Germany, and mostly blue.

belgium
Belgium atrocities

Our thoughts and hearts are with everyone in Belgium today.

Japan: Marking the anniversary of a tragedy

Exactly five years ago, on 11 March 2011, a violent earthquake struck eastern Japan. The tsunami that ensued devastated the inland up to 10km and put the Fukushima nuclear power plant at risk, forcing it out of action. The result was a humanitarian and environmental crisis. 

Forging a gender-balanced economy

“I am only a woman!” declares Sybylla Melvyn with deliberate irony, in the Australian classic novel, My Brilliant Career. When Miles Franklin wrote the novel in 1901, aged just 19, she was embarking on her own career path, and though successful, like Sybylla, she encountered many social, economic and cultural hurdles along the way.

ireland, globalisation, david haugh, oecd, economy, recession
Ireland’s economy: Still riding the globalisation wave

The recession in Ireland was long and deep, but has been followed by a marked recovery. Why is the expansion in Ireland so strong?

Dublin, economy, innovation, investment, ireland, IT, silicon docks
Banking on Silicon Docks
microsoft, innovation, ireland
OECD Observer roundtable: Ireland's innovation challenge

Ireland has bounced back from the crisis to become one of the OECD’s most dynamic economies. A key help has been the continued inflow of capital investment from abroad, allowing the country to bolster its position as a European hub for the likes of IT, finance, pharmaceuticals, engineering, and more. Ireland has been an attractive destination for global high-value investments for decades, yet its own innovation system lags that of other similar-sized OECD countries. Closing the gap would strengthen the country’s long-term outlook, but how can this be done?

interns, work, jobs, oecd, internship, trainee, salary, education
An intern's world?
Charlie Hebdo

Following the terrorist attack on French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, the OECD Secretary-General has expressed his condolences and support, on his behalf and that of the Organisation’s staff, to President Hollande and the French authorities. He also indicated that the OECD deplores this action, which is fundamentally opposed to the values we hold dear.

An artist in a rising sun: Yuko Sakurai

Yuko Sakurai is one of a new “global” generation of talented Japanese painters. Born in Tsuyama in 1970, Ms Sakurai has lived in North America and Europe, and is now based in Paris, France. Her warm, rich, virtually tactile paintings have won acclaim in several major cities, and were exhibited at the prestigious Venice Biennale in 2011. Ms Sakurai personifies a new, cool Japan and its enriching influence in an evolving global village. She describes some of her thoughts in this interview.